paririmbon of investment
Dari Tanah Kembali Ke Tanah

Through his foreword in the book of “Frequently Asked Questions On Investment”, The Chairman of Indonesia Investment Coordinating Board (Badan Koordinasi Penanaman Modal or BKPM) wrote that Indonesian economy continues to offer vast potential, thanks to the country’s sustainable economic growth, political stability, large young population, and growing middle class, as well as abundant natural resources. Investment has a large multiplier effect in boosting economic growth, creating job opportunities, and shifting the current consumption-based economy to an economy driven by production.

  • On a humid afternoon in a flat land called Jatiwangi, I imagined it all while looking at the men sitting lined up on the motorbike, waiting the workers came out from shoe factory that owned by an investor from Taiwan. I also had time to think that foreword on an overcast morning on a fast train from Taipei to Taichung city while looking at a pair of Indonesian workers who were holding hands and listening to a song together, on my visit to Taiwan last January. If I can answer easily, the impact of investment on economic growth in Jatiwangi — I’m haqul yaqin there is a growth that is . At least, you can feel it through several changes in everyday life.In every payday, there is an ATM queue growth of up to several meters, it takes one hour even though to get fifty thousand deposits. There is also a growth of food stalls with a variety of foods coming from a variety of regions where workers work in these new factories. Not to mention the growth of rented houses that can generate at least three million rupiahs for ten rooms each month. Following behind, the growth of laundry, motorcycle credit, smartphone counter, even love story.

And if economic growth is about transformation processes by leaving the old and celebrating new ones, then believe me that the Jatiwangi economy is on the rise, because tile factories as old industries that have existed since the colonial era are now slowly being abandoned and people are celebrating the waves of new investment. Even if the rate of economic growth can be seen from the increase in land prices, but still sold out, then I have to stop my daydream of the foreword below, because what was said by the Head of the Investment Board has really happened. Large and small scale investments have become part of everyday life, at least for us in Jatiwangi.

Let Me Tell You The History

Investment is not a new thing in Jatiwangi, whether it is realized or not, it has long been embedded in the Jatiwangi’s structure of socio-economy. When the first wave of during the Dutch East Indies in the late 19th century which manifested in the form of private sugar companies, Jatiwangi found a large sugar factory. Rice fields are transformed into sugar cane plantations complete with workers who come from various regions. That makes Jatiwangi a part of the first liberalization period in Indonesia and directly connected with the global sugar market.

In the early 20th century, among the sugar industry landscape, local investment also emerged in the form of roof tiles factories. They make roof tiles using the same soil as used for growing sugar cane and rice. I suspect this is the reaction of the Jatiwangi people to the sugar imperialism. We know that chronically the colonial sugar industry in the liberalization period gave birth to a very lame relationship, worse than the forced planting period. Where the colonial government applied a two-face economic system (dualism). The anthropologist Clifford Geertz in “Agricultural Involution” states that this system allows local farmers to produce the best quality export products, but at the same time the domestic sector such as family unit agriculture, home industry, and a little domestic trade is pressed so as not to develop. When the export sector expanded due to the increased prices of world commodity, the domestic sector is weakened. Land and labor are no longer used to cultivate rice and other food ingredients, but to cultivate sugar cane, coffee, and other trade crops. An attempt to keep the local people stay on in the old world but can produce world-class sugar products. Geertz also noted that this export sector was administrative capitalism, a system whose capital holders – Dutch people – regulated sales prices and wages, controlled expenses, and even dictated the production process.

This large plantation system is usually owned by a family that lives clustered in small, beautiful tropical bungalows near the factory walls. Supported by thousands of farmers who not only provide land, but also the labor needed to clean the land, dig holes, plant, cut and transport sugar cane to the factory. Plus other permanent labor related to the industry that is not counted. The sugar factory in Jatiwangi itself manages thousands of hectares of rice fields to be planted with sugar cane. And it is only run by a single family known as the “Juragan Besar” (Big Boss). This family is headed by G.M.W Zuur who has 11 children and almost all of them are born in Jatiwangi.

The encounter with the giant high-tech sugar companies in the middle of the rice fields does not at all guarantee the welfare of the local people. The forces of capitalism increasingly enter into the heart of village life. As a result, this colonial political economy gradually – even though it was colored by various ethical political policies – provided a foundation for the history of land privatization in Indonesia which continued to connect with the history of wage laborers, and of course the history of agrarian conflict which is still felt today.

Planting Sugar Cane in Jatiwangi, circa 1940

But the effort did not last too long. In 1930 the world faced a malaise or the Great Depression, a dramatic decline in the economy as a result of the fall of the international monetary system. The volume of international trade fell, which was followed by the cessation of investment and the drop of stocks in the wall street that destroyed the economies of industrialized and developing countries. Four years after that, the Dutch East Indies export revenue dropped by 70 percent. The Zuur Family, the Big Boss of the Jatiwangi Sugar Factory, had to gradually lift their suitcase back to his country. In 1940 the Dutch occupied Germany and the Dutch East Indies to become colonies without the motherland. While roof tile factories are increasingly growing in Jatiwangi, and slowly becoming a promising local industry, especially in the after independence. At that time Indonesia began to enter a new phase, the period of pursuing as a new nation, as well as other Southeast Asian countries.

After World War II, the process of decolonization was marked by the nationalization of foreign companies. In the process, Indonesians were busy taking over the administration, bureaucracy and political power sectors. While the modern role in the economic field was overtaken by the Overseas Chinese who had become a separate class which had special features in the economy due to the politics of three-tier racial segregation imposed by the Dutch. When Indonesia entered the New Order development regime which was open to foreign investment, Overseas Chinese became the most involved group in the economic sector, so that it benefited the most. In 1970 a Taiwanese construction company obtained a toll road construction project in Surabaya and Sumatra. Followed by industrial park development as a result of cooperation between Indonesian overseas Chinese and Taiwanese investors. This economic relationship with Taiwan grew stronger when the New Order government opened the first Indonesian chamber of commerce in Taipei in 1970.

New Era of Jatiwangi

The development ideology of the New Order had a major impact on the economic structure of Jatiwangi. The Public Housing Credit Policy in REPELITA II of the New Order boosted demand for Jatiwangi roof tile. The roof tile industrial landscape is increasingly widespread, which later gave birth to new rich people. The tile businessmen who were successful were not born from feudal class who ruled the land in the colonial period. Like Pak Haji Aspin, the founder of the most modern and biggest roof tile factory in Jatiwangi; Abadi Genteng, previously was a tofu seller. Most of them are born from the working class or domestic sector traders.

The roof tile industry reached a golden age in the late ’80s until the late ’90s. Externally this period was marked by the expansion of the Jatiwangi roof tile market, even to the export level. One of the export destination countries is Brunei Darussalam, where the Abadi Genteng Factory is the main supplier of roof tiles for the entire monarchical development program led by the Sultan Hashanah Bolqiah. Whereas internally, this period carries out new social landscapes in Jatiwangi; brokering ‘dynasty’, thuggery, cockfighting gambling by hundreds of millions rupiah, buy the latest cars and other various local-style hedonism. But interestingly, in the golden period of the roof tile industry, there is almost no investment from outside Jatiwangi. Except for the Abadi Genteng Factory, which established a merger with Terreal, a multinational tile company from France. But it didn’t last long. The roof tile industry is not at all related to international capitalism, but from a domestic standpoint, it is very strong. A situation that is 180 degrees different from the colonial sugar industry.

The golden age of roof tiles industry must end when Southeast Asia was hit by the 1997 monetary crisis. Surely the fall of Jatiwangi’s economic structure did not take place immediately; slowly but surely. Of the 600 roof tile factories in the 80-90s period, now only 120 are still surviving. At present, structurally the various types of new investments as part of the ASEAN Economic Community is one of the policies that allow the roof tile industry to be replaced by new types of industries such as textiles, garments, and other manufacturing that can accommodate thousands of workers per factory. These large capitals continue to manifest through the necessary privatization of land. Jatiwangi is again part of the wave of global investment. The state then facilitated with an investment reform policy that allows investors to get one-stop-services on investment licensing process as well as various tax incentives for investors.

Why Does It Matter And Why This Form?

History has told us that investment is a structural matter and is strongly influenced by what regime who is in power. There seemed to be deprived of the socio-cultural context in which the investment was invested. Apart from citizenship matters. The involvement is always hierarchical and the resident are at the bottom of the exploitation chain. The question is, from this investment enclave is there any cleft that can be intervened through a different narrative? In what way?

The Paririmbon Investasi Department has surveyed the alternative Investment departs from these questions. It’s experiment with the spirit of intervention through artistic means. At least until now, I envisioned two forms of responding to the wave of investment that coming to Jatiwangi, especially investment from Taiwan. The first form is to make an investment guidebook as a companion from the investment guidebook made by the Government. This book tries to speculate the spiritual dimensions of the Taiwanese and Indonesian people towards investment behavior through various approaches such as; Feng Shui, Astrology, Klenik, rituals, prayers, etc. that indeed become part of the cultural-spiritual life of the people of Taiwan and Indonesia.

The second form to respond (the wave if investment) is to offer another investment order from investment in the government sense. For this reason, I will act like the Indonesian Economic Trade Office (KDEI) in Taipei in facilitating and offering various types of alternative investments. Let me begin to explain these two forms in more details.

Paririmbon Investasi Books

Wirid-Panen, A Harvest Ritual in Supranatural Farming; 2019

This investment guidebook will experiment with various cultural-spiritual approaches to add a supernatural burden to the Investor. Extending the investment process with various ethical practices. Connecting various cultural aspects around the investment area, as a consideration for a more inclusive perspective in investing. It will target big investors who invest through the main door (Government). For that, we will work with IETO to distribute this book and become a companion book from an investment guidebook made by the Indonesian government. It will be compiled collectively through a series of workshops in Taiwan and Indonesia along with various kinds of participants; artists, curators, researchers, businessmen, startupper, farmers, community leaders and of course Fengshui Masters and astrologers. The first draft content of this manual is as follows:

I. Foreword from Chairman of Paririmbon Investasi Department
   Mr. Ismal Muntaha
   Foreword from Chief of Investment Department KDEI
   Mr. Mohammad Firdaus

II. About Jatiwangi
This chapter will also deeply contain of information about Jatiwangi from astrological chart readings which are calculated based on the latitude and longitude of Jatiwangi. This astrological reading is expected to be a guide for those who are interested to invest in Jatiwangi. In addition, we will also discuss the socio-cultural context of Jatiwangi, especially regarding the existence of the Jatiwangi art Factory, which since the last decade has been intensive enough to build regional awareness through cultural and artistic events. We also provide information about the spiritual context or local myths in Jatiwangi as reinforcement of cultural aspects in designing Jatiwangi. For us, the context of local myths, especially the existence of ancestral spirits, is one of the important stakeholders in designing Jatiwangi and part of intangible heritage.

III. How To Make an Investment in Jatiwangi (FAQ)
Contains of various instructions on investment ethics in Jatiwangi, especially related to how to build good relationships with neighbors. This procedure is taken from the local beliefs of the Jatiwangi community which is synergized with the spiritual dimension of the Taiwanese community. We’ll make this chapter as an FAQ form and here are some examples of the questions:    

a) How to build a factory in Jatiwangi?
If you want to make a factory in Jatiwangi there are several prerequisites that must be taken, including; First you have to make a shadow puppet show in the village closest to the location of the factory, in an effort to build a dialogue with the residents that will become a neighbor of factory that you will build. Second, the factory must be built based on Fengshui calculations that are very considerate of the principle of balance. Third, you also have to take the “Ngajimatan Taneuh” ritual which functions as a request for permission to the ancestors who inhabit the land where your factory will be built. There is a lot of experience that the ancestors or the spirit became angry because the investors didn’t make a ritual to ask a permission when they build a factory. And it caused a mass exorcism of the factory worker, like what happened in PT. Shinwo Mulia – Jatiwangi (Garment Factory). The worker said it happens almost every weeks.

b) How to open a factory in Jatiwangi?
After you build a factory based on the preconditions above, there are several more rituals that must be taken when you want to open or inaugurate the factory. For example; Making “Nasi Tumpeng” (Yellow rice) and share to the neighbors, or the ritual of praying for the factory, and various traditional dances as a form of respect for the ancestors.

c) Other Ritual Requirements
Contains information about another rituals requirement as a prerequisite for keeping your investment safe and smooth, for example;
Plant 15 Jati tree in every full moon or the 15th day in the Chinese calendar.

IV. Investment Sector Based on Wu Xing
Wu Xing or Five Elements is the basic philosophy of various kinds of applied sciences in the Chinese tradition because he is considered to represent various elements that exist in the cosmos constellation and contains the principle of balance. So, we will create a special workshop with experts in Taiwan to design the investment sector based on Wu Xing’s principles.

V. Do and Don’t When You Invest in Jatiwangi
In this chapter we will cover what should and should not be done when investing in Jatiwangi based on two approaches; zodiac reading from prospective investors and based on local believe tradition. For example, in the local Jatiwangi tradition or the broader Sundanese tradition and even Javanese, we know the term “Pamali”. One term for somethings that are considered bad if done because it can cause bad things to happen, for example; Don’t cut an old tree when you build a factory, at least you promise to plant the new ones. Or don’t build a factory near a graveyard, etc.

VI. Tips and Trick to Avoid Bad Luck
As we know, bad things sometimes often occur, even beyond our reasoning. Here are examples of tips on how to avoid your investment from various kinds of bad luck, especially when your factory has been established; Don’t move employees to another city, without holding a shadow puppet show ritual, etc.

Investment Package

As a department, Paririmbon Investasi is interested in making other investment arrangements, both in terms of ideas and facilitating alternative investments. This department will invite Taiwanese contemporary art stakeholders; collectors, museums, galleries, art organizations/ institutions, art collectives, curators and artists to make an investment in Jatiwangi. Specifically, the investment package will depart from the business model that has been carried out by the local people. This means that the position of citizens here is as business partners, not as workers. Investors will get profit sharing based on the form of an investment package and the amount. We will modify the form of these investments to be more experimental.

In government terms, capital-intensive investments are investments with large capital and high technology. But in our sense, it is an investment with capital that is not large but has dignity. This means that this capital will fall on businesses that are managed collectively by citizens, not individuals.

Other form of investments that we offered are a non-capital investment, but more precisely in the form of expertise or ideas. An artist can invest by taking his time, energy, expertise or ideas to develop a more imaginative business. This investment model adopt an artist residency program; the difference is that artists still get profit sharing with the agreed amount. For that, we as a department will make a stock card for those interested in investing in labor-intensive forms.

These following are some of the investment packages that we offer, departing from various businesses that are managed collectively:

  1. Supranatural Farming
    An agribusiness that is managed in kinship and organic-supernatural. Where each process lived with many rituals and compassion. In an effort to achieve self-sufficiency in the village, which is based on a bond and a new perspective on the process of land. This area is only 1400 square meters managed collectively with full rituals on the conflicting land between residents of  Wates Village and the Indonesian Air Force. For this reason, by investing in this agriculture, you also mean that you are struggling with the people of Kampung Wates in making a cultural reclaim to the land of Wates.
  2. Soil Modular
    Brick factories or modular products that environmentally friendly because they are made from soil and a mixture of rice waste and do not need to be burned. This brick will be produced by home industries spread in various villages and utilizes leisure time from farming.
  1. Jatiwangi Roof Tiles Museum
    Jatiwangi Roof Tiles Museum is a forum for research, struggle and renew the Jatiwangi soil. This museum collaborates with roof tiles practitioners (workers and factory owners) to slowly collect and record data and facts related to roof tiles culture. To talk about the land with more dignity, we believe the Jatiwangi Roof Tile Museum is the first thing that is worth talking about.
  2. Saung Ciranggon
    Saung Ciranggon is a restaurant that is fully managed by the people of Kampung Wates. Food purchased at this restaurant is taken from vegetables grown by residents by utilizing land in their yard. The menus that are served are also the best of neighboring recipes. So every family that has a menu in the restaurant will have some stock as their investment.

    5. Earth Housing Project

    A residential housing contractor business managed collectively by one village and guided by a soil architect bureau. This business handles the construction of environmentally friendly homes using rammed earth techniques. Build a house using soil from the land where the house will be built with only using 1% of cement.

    6. Make Your Own Investment
    Yes, you can make your own investment as long as it can be an inclusive form of business and make Jatiwangi residents as partners, not a workers.

We hope that this guidance can offer a better understanding of investing in Jatiwangi. We understood that there are still many needed to be improved – as mentioneded, it will be part of collective working through a series of workshop. Finally, we invite you to explore the opportunities to invest Jatiwangi as an art practitioner. Paririmbon Investasi Department is ready and more than happy to assist you.

Jatiwangi, March 2019

Chairman of Paririmbon Investasi

Ismal Muntaha

Through his foreword in the book of “Frequently Asked Questions On Investment”, The Chairman of Indonesia Investment Coordinating Board (Badan Koordinasi Penanaman Modal or BKPM) wrote that Indonesian economy continues to offer vast potential, thanks to the country’s sustainable economic growth, political stability, large young population, and growing middle class, as well as abundant natural resources. Investment has a large multiplier effect in boosting economic growth, creating job opportunities, and shifting the current consumption-based economy to an economy driven by production.

  • On a humid afternoon in a flat land called Jatiwangi, I imagined it all while looking at the men sitting lined up on the motorbike, waiting the workers came out from shoe factory that owned by an investor from Taiwan. I also had time to think that foreword on an overcast morning on a fast train from Taipei to Taichung city while looking at a pair of Indonesian workers who were holding hands and listening to a song together, on my visit to Taiwan last January. If I can answer easily, the impact of investment on economic growth in Jatiwangi — I’m haqul yaqin there is a growth that is . At least, you can feel it through several changes in everyday life.In every payday, there is an ATM queue growth of up to several meters, it takes one hour even though to get fifty thousand deposits. There is also a growth of food stalls with a variety of foods coming from a variety of regions where workers work in these new factories. Not to mention the growth of rented houses that can generate at least three million rupiahs for ten rooms each month. Following behind, the growth of laundry, motorcycle credit, smartphone counter, even love story.

And if economic growth is about transformation processes by leaving the old and celebrating new ones, then believe me that the Jatiwangi economy is on the rise, because tile factories as old industries that have existed since the colonial era are now slowly being abandoned and people are celebrating the waves of new investment. Even if the rate of economic growth can be seen from the increase in land prices, but still sold out, then I have to stop my daydream of the foreword below, because what was said by the Head of the Investment Board has really happened. Large and small scale investments have become part of everyday life, at least for us in Jatiwangi.

Let Me Tell You The History

Investment is not a new thing in Jatiwangi, whether it is realized or not, it has long been embedded in the Jatiwangi’s structure of socio-economy. When the first wave of during the Dutch East Indies in the late 19th century which manifested in the form of private sugar companies, Jatiwangi found a large sugar factory. Rice fields are transformed into sugar cane plantations complete with workers who come from various regions. That makes Jatiwangi a part of the first liberalization period in Indonesia and directly connected with the global sugar market.

In the early 20th century, among the sugar industry landscape, local investment also emerged in the form of roof tiles factories. They make roof tiles using the same soil as used for growing sugar cane and rice. I suspect this is the reaction of the Jatiwangi people to the sugar imperialism. We know that chronically the colonial sugar industry in the liberalization period gave birth to a very lame relationship, worse than the forced planting period. Where the colonial government applied a two-face economic system (dualism). The anthropologist Clifford Geertz in “Agricultural Involution” states that this system allows local farmers to produce the best quality export products, but at the same time the domestic sector such as family unit agriculture, home industry, and a little domestic trade is pressed so as not to develop. When the export sector expanded due to the increased prices of world commodity, the domestic sector is weakened. Land and labor are no longer used to cultivate rice and other food ingredients, but to cultivate sugar cane, coffee, and other trade crops. An attempt to keep the local people stay on in the old world but can produce world-class sugar products. Geertz also noted that this export sector was administrative capitalism, a system whose capital holders – Dutch people – regulated sales prices and wages, controlled expenses, and even dictated the production process.

This large plantation system is usually owned by a family that lives clustered in small, beautiful tropical bungalows near the factory walls. Supported by thousands of farmers who not only provide land, but also the labor needed to clean the land, dig holes, plant, cut and transport sugar cane to the factory. Plus other permanent labor related to the industry that is not counted. The sugar factory in Jatiwangi itself manages thousands of hectares of rice fields to be planted with sugar cane. And it is only run by a single family known as the “Juragan Besar” (Big Boss). This family is headed by G.M.W Zuur who has 11 children and almost all of them are born in Jatiwangi.

The encounter with the giant high-tech sugar companies in the middle of the rice fields does not at all guarantee the welfare of the local people. The forces of capitalism increasingly enter into the heart of village life. As a result, this colonial political economy gradually – even though it was colored by various ethical political policies – provided a foundation for the history of land privatization in Indonesia which continued to connect with the history of wage laborers, and of course the history of agrarian conflict which is still felt today.

Planting Sugar Cane in Jatiwangi, circa 1940

But the effort did not last too long. In 1930 the world faced a malaise or the Great Depression, a dramatic decline in the economy as a result of the fall of the international monetary system. The volume of international trade fell, which was followed by the cessation of investment and the drop of stocks in the wall street that destroyed the economies of industrialized and developing countries. Four years after that, the Dutch East Indies export revenue dropped by 70 percent. The Zuur Family, the Big Boss of the Jatiwangi Sugar Factory, had to gradually lift their suitcase back to his country. In 1940 the Dutch occupied Germany and the Dutch East Indies to become colonies without the motherland. While roof tile factories are increasingly growing in Jatiwangi, and slowly becoming a promising local industry, especially in the after independence. At that time Indonesia began to enter a new phase, the period of pursuing as a new nation, as well as other Southeast Asian countries.

After World War II, the process of decolonization was marked by the nationalization of foreign companies. In the process, Indonesians were busy taking over the administration, bureaucracy and political power sectors. While the modern role in the economic field was overtaken by the Overseas Chinese who had become a separate class which had special features in the economy due to the politics of three-tier racial segregation imposed by the Dutch. When Indonesia entered the New Order development regime which was open to foreign investment, Overseas Chinese became the most involved group in the economic sector, so that it benefited the most. In 1970 a Taiwanese construction company obtained a toll road construction project in Surabaya and Sumatra. Followed by industrial park development as a result of cooperation between Indonesian overseas Chinese and Taiwanese investors. This economic relationship with Taiwan grew stronger when the New Order government opened the first Indonesian chamber of commerce in Taipei in 1970.

New Era of Jatiwangi

The development ideology of the New Order had a major impact on the economic structure of Jatiwangi. The Public Housing Credit Policy in REPELITA II of the New Order boosted demand for Jatiwangi roof tile. The roof tile industrial landscape is increasingly widespread, which later gave birth to new rich people. The tile businessmen who were successful were not born from feudal class who ruled the land in the colonial period. Like Pak Haji Aspin, the founder of the most modern and biggest roof tile factory in Jatiwangi; Abadi Genteng, previously was a tofu seller. Most of them are born from the working class or domestic sector traders.

The roof tile industry reached a golden age in the late ’80s until the late ’90s. Externally this period was marked by the expansion of the Jatiwangi roof tile market, even to the export level. One of the export destination countries is Brunei Darussalam, where the Abadi Genteng Factory is the main supplier of roof tiles for the entire monarchical development program led by the Sultan Hashanah Bolqiah. Whereas internally, this period carries out new social landscapes in Jatiwangi; brokering ‘dynasty’, thuggery, cockfighting gambling by hundreds of millions rupiah, buy the latest cars and other various local-style hedonism. But interestingly, in the golden period of the roof tile industry, there is almost no investment from outside Jatiwangi. Except for the Abadi Genteng Factory, which established a merger with Terreal, a multinational tile company from France. But it didn’t last long. The roof tile industry is not at all related to international capitalism, but from a domestic standpoint, it is very strong. A situation that is 180 degrees different from the colonial sugar industry.

The golden age of roof tiles industry must end when Southeast Asia was hit by the 1997 monetary crisis. Surely the fall of Jatiwangi’s economic structure did not take place immediately; slowly but surely. Of the 600 roof tile factories in the 80-90s period, now only 120 are still surviving. At present, structurally the various types of new investments as part of the ASEAN Economic Community is one of the policies that allow the roof tile industry to be replaced by new types of industries such as textiles, garments, and other manufacturing that can accommodate thousands of workers per factory. These large capitals continue to manifest through the necessary privatization of land. Jatiwangi is again part of the wave of global investment. The state then facilitated with an investment reform policy that allows investors to get one-stop-services on investment licensing process as well as various tax incentives for investors.

Why Does It Matter And Why This Form?

History has told us that investment is a structural matter and is strongly influenced by what regime who is in power. There seemed to be deprived of the socio-cultural context in which the investment was invested. Apart from citizenship matters. The involvement is always hierarchical and the resident are at the bottom of the exploitation chain. The question is, from this investment enclave is there any cleft that can be intervened through a different narrative? In what way?

The Paririmbon Investasi Department has surveyed the alternative Investment departs from these questions. It’s experiment with the spirit of intervention through artistic means. At least until now, I envisioned two forms of responding to the wave of investment that coming to Jatiwangi, especially investment from Taiwan. The first form is to make an investment guidebook as a companion from the investment guidebook made by the Government. This book tries to speculate the spiritual dimensions of the Taiwanese and Indonesian people towards investment behavior through various approaches such as; Feng Shui, Astrology, Klenik, rituals, prayers, etc. that indeed become part of the cultural-spiritual life of the people of Taiwan and Indonesia.

The second form to respond (the wave if investment) is to offer another investment order from investment in the government sense. For this reason, I will act like the Indonesian Economic Trade Office (KDEI) in Taipei in facilitating and offering various types of alternative investments. Let me begin to explain these two forms in more details.

Paririmbon Investasi Books

Wirid-Panen, A Harvest Ritual in Supranatural Farming; 2019

This investment guidebook will experiment with various cultural-spiritual approaches to add a supernatural burden to the Investor. Extending the investment process with various ethical practices. Connecting various cultural aspects around the investment area, as a consideration for a more inclusive perspective in investing. It will target big investors who invest through the main door (Government). For that, we will work with IETO to distribute this book and become a companion book from an investment guidebook made by the Indonesian government. It will be compiled collectively through a series of workshops in Taiwan and Indonesia along with various kinds of participants; artists, curators, researchers, businessmen, startupper, farmers, community leaders and of course Fengshui Masters and astrologers. The first draft content of this manual is as follows:

I. Foreword from Chairman of Paririmbon Investasi Department
   Mr. Ismal Muntaha
   Foreword from Chief of Investment Department KDEI
   Mr. Mohammad Firdaus

II. About Jatiwangi
This chapter will also deeply contain of information about Jatiwangi from astrological chart readings which are calculated based on the latitude and longitude of Jatiwangi. This astrological reading is expected to be a guide for those who are interested to invest in Jatiwangi. In addition, we will also discuss the socio-cultural context of Jatiwangi, especially regarding the existence of the Jatiwangi art Factory, which since the last decade has been intensive enough to build regional awareness through cultural and artistic events. We also provide information about the spiritual context or local myths in Jatiwangi as reinforcement of cultural aspects in designing Jatiwangi. For us, the context of local myths, especially the existence of ancestral spirits, is one of the important stakeholders in designing Jatiwangi and part of intangible heritage.

III. How To Make an Investment in Jatiwangi (FAQ)
Contains of various instructions on investment ethics in Jatiwangi, especially related to how to build good relationships with neighbors. This procedure is taken from the local beliefs of the Jatiwangi community which is synergized with the spiritual dimension of the Taiwanese community. We’ll make this chapter as an FAQ form and here are some examples of the questions:    

a) How to build a factory in Jatiwangi?
If you want to make a factory in Jatiwangi there are several prerequisites that must be taken, including; First you have to make a shadow puppet show in the village closest to the location of the factory, in an effort to build a dialogue with the residents that will become a neighbor of factory that you will build. Second, the factory must be built based on Fengshui calculations that are very considerate of the principle of balance. Third, you also have to take the “Ngajimatan Taneuh” ritual which functions as a request for permission to the ancestors who inhabit the land where your factory will be built. There is a lot of experience that the ancestors or the spirit became angry because the investors didn’t make a ritual to ask a permission when they build a factory. And it caused a mass exorcism of the factory worker, like what happened in PT. Shinwo Mulia – Jatiwangi (Garment Factory). The worker said it happens almost every weeks.

b) How to open a factory in Jatiwangi?
After you build a factory based on the preconditions above, there are several more rituals that must be taken when you want to open or inaugurate the factory. For example; Making “Nasi Tumpeng” (Yellow rice) and share to the neighbors, or the ritual of praying for the factory, and various traditional dances as a form of respect for the ancestors.

c) Other Ritual Requirements
Contains information about another rituals requirement as a prerequisite for keeping your investment safe and smooth, for example;
Plant 15 Jati tree in every full moon or the 15th day in the Chinese calendar.

IV. Investment Sector Based on Wu Xing
Wu Xing or Five Elements is the basic philosophy of various kinds of applied sciences in the Chinese tradition because he is considered to represent various elements that exist in the cosmos constellation and contains the principle of balance. So, we will create a special workshop with experts in Taiwan to design the investment sector based on Wu Xing’s principles.

V. Do and Don’t When You Invest in Jatiwangi
In this chapter we will cover what should and should not be done when investing in Jatiwangi based on two approaches; zodiac reading from prospective investors and based on local believe tradition. For example, in the local Jatiwangi tradition or the broader Sundanese tradition and even Javanese, we know the term “Pamali”. One term for somethings that are considered bad if done because it can cause bad things to happen, for example; Don’t cut an old tree when you build a factory, at least you promise to plant the new ones. Or don’t build a factory near a graveyard, etc.

VI. Tips and Trick to Avoid Bad Luck
As we know, bad things sometimes often occur, even beyond our reasoning. Here are examples of tips on how to avoid your investment from various kinds of bad luck, especially when your factory has been established; Don’t move employees to another city, without holding a shadow puppet show ritual, etc.

Investment Package

As a department, Paririmbon Investasi is interested in making other investment arrangements, both in terms of ideas and facilitating alternative investments. This department will invite Taiwanese contemporary art stakeholders; collectors, museums, galleries, art organizations/ institutions, art collectives, curators and artists to make an investment in Jatiwangi. Specifically, the investment package will depart from the business model that has been carried out by the local people. This means that the position of citizens here is as business partners, not as workers. Investors will get profit sharing based on the form of an investment package and the amount. We will modify the form of these investments to be more experimental.

In government terms, capital-intensive investments are investments with large capital and high technology. But in our sense, it is an investment with capital that is not large but has dignity. This means that this capital will fall on businesses that are managed collectively by citizens, not individuals.

Other form of investments that we offered are a non-capital investment, but more precisely in the form of expertise or ideas. An artist can invest by taking his time, energy, expertise or ideas to develop a more imaginative business. This investment model adopt an artist residency program; the difference is that artists still get profit sharing with the agreed amount. For that, we as a department will make a stock card for those interested in investing in labor-intensive forms.

These following are some of the investment packages that we offer, departing from various businesses that are managed collectively:

  1. Supranatural Farming
    An agribusiness that is managed in kinship and organic-supernatural. Where each process lived with many rituals and compassion. In an effort to achieve self-sufficiency in the village, which is based on a bond and a new perspective on the process of land. This area is only 1400 square meters managed collectively with full rituals on the conflicting land between residents of  Wates Village and the Indonesian Air Force. For this reason, by investing in this agriculture, you also mean that you are struggling with the people of Kampung Wates in making a cultural reclaim to the land of Wates.
  2. Soil Modular
    Brick factories or modular products that environmentally friendly because they are made from soil and a mixture of rice waste and do not need to be burned. This brick will be produced by home industries spread in various villages and utilizes leisure time from farming.
  1. Jatiwangi Roof Tiles Museum
    Jatiwangi Roof Tiles Museum is a forum for research, struggle and renew the Jatiwangi soil. This museum collaborates with roof tiles practitioners (workers and factory owners) to slowly collect and record data and facts related to roof tiles culture. To talk about the land with more dignity, we believe the Jatiwangi Roof Tile Museum is the first thing that is worth talking about.
  2. Saung Ciranggon
    Saung Ciranggon is a restaurant that is fully managed by the people of Kampung Wates. Food purchased at this restaurant is taken from vegetables grown by residents by utilizing land in their yard. The menus that are served are also the best of neighboring recipes. So every family that has a menu in the restaurant will have some stock as their investment.

    5. Earth Housing Project

    A residential housing contractor business managed collectively by one village and guided by a soil architect bureau. This business handles the construction of environmentally friendly homes using rammed earth techniques. Build a house using soil from the land where the house will be built with only using 1% of cement.

    6. Make Your Own Investment
    Yes, you can make your own investment as long as it can be an inclusive form of business and make Jatiwangi residents as partners, not a workers.

We hope that this guidance can offer a better understanding of investing in Jatiwangi. We understood that there are still many needed to be improved – as mentioneded, it will be part of collective working through a series of workshop. Finally, we invite you to explore the opportunities to invest Jatiwangi as an art practitioner. Paririmbon Investasi Department is ready and more than happy to assist you.

Jatiwangi, March 2019

Chairman of Paririmbon Investasi

Ismal Muntaha

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All work on this site is licensed under an Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Creative Commons License.